manufacturer of EMS products manufacturer of EMS products

Get mail on new products

The Usage of Oropharyngeal Airway

Posted: 2018-06-06 13:52

                                                  An oropharyngeal device for insertion into the mouth of a patient. The device includes a body having a distal end and a proximal end with

                                                  a flange formed at the proximal end. The distal end is inserted into the mouth until the flange is disposed outside and adjacent to the

                                                  patient's mouth. The flange keeps the proximal device from entering the mouth. The body is sized such that the distal end of the body is

                                                  disposed within the pharynx above the epiglottis. The device includes a channel that forms an airway between the ends. The device also

                                                  includes at least three separate conduits integrated into the body for administering oxygen, suctioning, and for assessing ventilation

                                                  thorough end-tidal carbon dioxide monitoring.

                                                  It is important to estimate the required size of an oropharyngeal airway. If it is too big it may occlude the patient's airway by displacing the

                                                  epiglottis (Skinner and Vincent, 1997), or it may hinder the use of a face mask and may damage laryngeal structures. If it is too small it may

                                                  occlude the airway by pushing the tongue back. A correctly sized airway is one that holds the tongue in the normal anatomical position and

                                                  follows its natural curvature. The curved body of the airway is designed to fit over the back of the tongue.

                                                  The OPA is measured against the patient's head (from the earlobe to the corner of the oral opening) and then inserted into the patient's mouth

                                                  upside down. Once contact is made with the back of the throat, the airway is rotated 180 degrees, allowing for easy insertion, and assuring

                                                  that the tongue is secured. Measuring is very important, as the flared ends of the airway must now rest securely against the oral opening in

                                                  order to remain secure. Use of an OPA does not remove the need for the recovery position and ongoing assessment of the airway and it does

                                                  not prevent obstruction by liquids (blood, saliva, food, cerebrospinal fluid) or the closing of the glottis. It can, however, facilitate ventilation during

                                                  CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation) and for persons with a large tongue.

                                                  The device also includes at least three separate conduits integrated into the body for administering oxygen, suctioning, and for assessing

                                                  ventilation through end-tidal carbon dioxide monitoring. The conduits for oxygenation and suctioning extend through the body between its

                                                  proximal and distal ends. The conduit for end-tidal carbon dioxide monitoring extends along and is attached to a side wall of the channel and

                                                  terminates within the channel.

Site Map
About
News
Blog
Contact
Product
Stair solution
Stretcher
Rescue
Medical trolley
Military
Hospital bed
MRI feature
Surgey equipment
Contact
Dragon Industry(ZJG) Co., Ltd
info@dragon-iec.com
0086-512-88831198
+86-15301563922
INQUIRY